We found – 25 articles for children

#StillSTAND Project’s Vorspiel: Johannes Mundinger and Señor Schnu

Just before the official kickoff of our Still STAND project where 4 applications to paint the Urban Spree Artist Wall have been selected – out of 89 submissions – and will unfold over the course of June and July 2020, both Johannes Mundinger and Señor Schnu wanted to give a face lift to the wall after a long winter, and Corona oblige, actually much longer than we had anticipated.

Johannes Mundinger at Urban Spree, April 2020

Johannes Mundinger painted the large wall at Urban Spree mid-April 2020 (his third take on the wall, setting thereby a new record) with an abstract composition in tune with the “Leave No One Behind” campaign to repatriate refugee children from camps in Greece.

Shortly after, Señor Schnu took over the Wall with a vibrant composition assembling different elements from propaganda, economics, and positive symbols to make a statement: “We can’t return to normal, because the normal we had was precisely the problem” or how legitimate aspirations to “get back to normal” owing to the corona crisis must instead give way to healthier relationships and a different way to create social links.

As the Still STAND team started to get together for the first upcoming wall of the project, our drone photographer, Lukas Stiller, managed to take spectacular shots of the wall at dusk.



New York Perspectives

Urban Spree Galerie presents New York Perspectives, a duo show featuring Chris “Daze” Ellis and Joe Conzo, curated by Mode2. The vernissage will be on Friday, November 22nd, at 18:30, in presence of the two artists.

    Through the work of two New York City-born artists, a painter and a photographer, this exhibition is an attempt to show aspects of New York City life, through the eyes and the work of two very different individuals; though both come from a part of its counterculture.

    The drawings and paintings of the artist Chris “Daze” Ellis, and those many moments and people captured by the photography of Joe Conzo show us how the youth that were more in osmosis with the steel, the concrete, the glass, the streets and the city’s subway system, could develop new forms of visual dialogue that could form a bridge between their own social and cultural background, and a movement that would infiltrate the artworld and become a global phenonmenon.

   Coming from different neighbourhoods and cultural backgrounds, both have lived long enough to have witnessed first hand the huge transformations that the city has gone through over these last decades, while their “work”, which was actually their hobby, passion and life pretty much, has documented seminal eras during that time.

  These tumultuous years of cultural flux; of blossoming, blooming, destruction and rebirth, are often overlooked by today’s focus on the “now” of street art, and the way through which this eclipses the very alchemy that gave birth to the way in which artists express themselves in the street today, or the way in which they document city life.

    It is doubtful that much of what is happening today in visual art, music, dance and written or spoken word ever would have happened, if generations of youth in New York City had not lived what they did many decades ago; and we can count ourselves lucky that a few rare individuals happened to be there and have the instinct to document it.

  Here then, are views of New York from two different perspectives, they themselves being a complex accumulation of all of life’s experiences, and how they shape each individual’s understanding of the world around them; and the ways by which they choose to express and share this with us.

Urban Spree Prints will release two 18″x 24″ silk screen prints by Daze on the opening night and online.

The gallery and the curator heartily thank Henry Chalfant for letting us show his documentary movie “From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale.”

Poster Artwork by Tyler Askew.

 

“New York Perspectives”

Christopher “Daze” Ellis / Joe Conzo

Curated by Mode2

22.11 – 21.12.2019

 

Urban Spree Galerie

Revaler Str. 99

10245 Berlin

Opening: Friday 22.11.2019 at 18:30

Exhibition: Tu-Sa – 12:00 – 18:30

Info & Catalogue: contact@urbanspree.com

 

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BIOGRAPHIES: 

 

Chris “Daze” Ellis

Growing up in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, Chris Daze Ellis (b. 1962) was aware from early on of the names and the odd characters that would be dancing along the trains that wove their way through the city. When he started out at the High School of Art & Design in 1976, he found that there was a whole community of very diverse yet like-minded individuals there, also involved with this scene; some of whom would go on to make a name for themselves in the art world.

Being a fan of drawing and comic books already, Daze camouflaged his nighttime activities under his parents’ gaze, exploring and expanding his visual vocabulary, combining the traditional with the dynamism of a new and challenging environment, with stimulus of its own.

Having mastered the medium and the environment, Daze would go on to shape his own personal vision of the world, looking as much inwards as outwards, in the relationship between the trains and walls, and what he could further explore in the studio. The strength of his successful life as an artist in his own right would develop from then on.

From his participation in his first group show, Beyond Words, at the Mudd Club in 1981, before having his own solo show at Fashion Moda (the historical South Bronx art space that bridged the established art world with the raw talent and energy coming out of New York City), Daze embraced the wide horizon that opened up before him.

From then on, Daze began to show in many different cities around the world, whether it be galleries and museum, in solo shows as well as group formats. He has participated in many public or educational art projects around the world, working with students and communities from South Korea to Brazil via Haiti, while often visiting Europe as well, and contributing to New York mural initiatives like the Leap Arts Program or Thrive Collective.

From his appearances in the film Style Wars, to being an art consultant on the Netflix series The Get Down in 2017, to participating in public painting projects from the Star Ferry Terminal in Hong Kong in 1993, painting an entire Hannover train station with fellow artists Lee Quinones and John Crash Matos, or being commissioned for murals by private clients like the law firm, Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in Washington D.C. 2018; Daze has constantly had his hands on a whole range of different projects.

Daze’s paintings have found themselves in many private collections including Eric Clapton, Natalie Imbruglia, and Madonna. His work can also be found in the permanent collections of The Whitney Museum, NY, Museum of Modern art, NY, The Museum of the city of New York, The Ludwig Museum, Aachen, Yale University art Gallery, New Haven, Addison Museum of American Art at the Phillips Academy, Andover.

Chris Daze Ellis continues to live and work in New York City.

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Joe Conzo

Joe Conzo was born in the Bronx during an era of great upheaval, when the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway was nearing its end, having destroyed the communities that lay in its path, and condemning those parts of the borough around it to social and economic decline. The apocalyptic landscapes of urban devastation, and the high criminality associated to it are emblematic of that era.

President Truman’s Urban Renewal announced in 1949, ruthlessly applied by Robert Moses, targetted the more modest and ethnically diverse neighbourhoods of New York City whose resistance to forced removal would fall on deaf ears, as private developers grabbed the prime lots. The Bronx represented both the laboratory and the collateral damage for these extreme experiments of urban renewal.

And yet, out of what looked like an urban war zone, the city’s youth began to pick up the pieces, and, out of the desolation around them, began to build their own road out of it. Realising that the state was not going to do anything positive for them, their survival instincts eventually kicked in; and out of the gang culture, the drugs, and the sheer nihilism that had reigned for a while over much of the borough, new and greener shoots were beginning to break through.

Joe Conzo’s cultural capital, and that of his peers, was probably key to his survival and his blossoming during those harsh years; grandson of Dr. Evelina López Antonetty, a political activist who played a huge role in developing educational programmes for Puerto Rican children, and son of Joe Conzo Snr., who was in the thick of the huge Latin music scene of that bridged those decades; hanging with all the main players of that era, and having been the biographer of Tito Puente.

While studying at the Agnes Russell School on the campus of Columbia University, he discovered photography, the medium that would enable him to document what went on around him; from the world of latin culture through his father’s connections, to the collision of art forms that would later be called Hip Hop; a word that eclipses the sum of its parts.

Having lived many ups and downs in the eighties, to a rebirth of sorts, Joe Conzo went on to become a qualified medical nurse, then worked for the New York City Fire Department, being among the first responders on 9/11. At some point along the way, he was reunited with the camera, and began shooting again…

Whether as the photographer of rap crew The Cold Crush Brothers, a hugely influential group of MCs from the early days, or just a boy from the Bronx who had a camera and curious eyes, Joe Conzo’s photos provided reference material to Henry Chalfant ‘s documentary “From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale.”, and were documented in a book called “Born In The Bronx: A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop”.

His negatives have been digitalised and archived at Cornell University, providing a unique and indispensable resource for those wishing to research the those eras.



Microclimat Collective

Introduction

“Microclimat is a project of free celebration in the public space. We set up in parks, forests, gardens, skating rinks, quays, squares, underground and wasteland in the Paris region, set up a decoration between fairgrounds, flea markets and more unexpected constructions, set up games and workshops for children, schedule mixes, live shows and sometimes concerts. The musical programming is mainly oriented house, techno and sometimes bass music when the party is at night, but also jazz, funk, rock, disco, reggae and songs in the afternoon.”

Listen here -> https://microclimat.bandcamp.com/?fbclid=IwAR0DZLlen2M0KUdvyAFp9W4qNpKp5zzpzD6Fl_DGVsTKplxFjEIlMu60gYk



Imarhan (ALG) + Sundays & Cybele

The David Watts Foundation presents:

IMARHAN (ALG) – Tuareg funk, fuzz, disco, rock
+ Support Sundays & Cybele (JAP) – psych, kraut

When Imarhan released their self-titled debut album in 2016, their tender, soulful, intense vision of a genre of music that was already flooded with talent and exposure still managed to float to the top and be heralded as a pivotal record of the “New Wave Of Tuareg Music”.

“Temet” is a huge leap forward in the creative sound and production for the band. Whereas their debut was anchored in the meditative desert blues tradition, Temet blows clear of any such notions, finding bounce and drive by stirring their sound with funk, fuzz, disco and rock.

This is not an alien mood to the band: any of the (thousands?) of people who have danced at their live shows will attest to the disparity between their emotional and thoughtful first release and the raucous, ecstatic live shows the band ripped through, for hours at a time, in their 2017 tours. While “Temet” is decisively more eclectic than their debut, their wisdom and singular vision is as manifest as it was in their first offering. Imarhan’s experience as a touring band since the first album has only honed their focus and meaning behind their music: Their focus in this case is a Nomadic traveller’s reflection on today’s struggles. “Temet” in Tamashek means “connections” – It’s an energetic wake up call for unity, reminding people that we are all are connected and that only through the acceptance and uptake of this union will we be able to solve the troubles all cultures seem to be dealing with in this important moment in time.

“People should love each other. They need to know each other, we need to know each other, everyone should get to know their neighbour. We need to have the same approach as our elders. You will stumble across an old man who knows the world and will hand down his knowledge to his children.” Iyad Moussa Ben Abderahmane – aka Sadam

FB EVENT



Christopher Stead: Acid Reign

Urban Spree Galerie presents “Acid Reign“, the first solo show in Germany of the British visual artist Christopher Stead.

Acid Reign is the culmination of a long-term residency at Lab Kalkhost in North Germany. Christopher Stead produced on the shores of the Baltic Sea several large format works, using a process mixing graffiti techniques and natural elements.

Cans of paint are burst with nails, sand and mud is flung. An alchemy between the paint and the land turns into a painterly concrete, cementing ideas, solidifying a tangible truth. The paintings are stuffed into rucksacks and returned to the studio where Ikea bags full of previous endeavours lie dormant ready to rework. A fecund process is born.

The fences used in the supports of the pieces are taken from decaying plots on the train lines.

Rusty fences, transgressed and twisted by nature are transported to the studio. The erosion of the metal emasculates the sterile man-made purity of the material. This gives each painting a story and a history. Every fence painting starts at night on the train tracks with a pair of bolt cutters and finds its way into the light of the studio and finally into the gaze of the public domain.

Artist Statement:

“Once upon a time, on a small island called Great Britain, there lived a lady called Margaret Thatcher. Margaret along with her Tory Party ruled the land with an iron fist and squeezed the living life out of its people. Fed up of a decade of draconian rule, the people began to gather and dance their woes away at their own party. They called this the Acid House party.

Race and class barriers were dissolved as the people united and raved as one big family. The Tory party didn’t like this as they weren’t invited, so they invented a law to stop the gathering of 20 or more people, dancing to the sounds of repetitive beats. Techno, Jungle, call it what you want. It had to stop. Whilst this may sound like a children’s horror story, it was in fact or certainly a young adults nightmare. 30 years on, the nightmare continues. Britain is again been torn apart by the right.

The paintings in Acid Reign were made on the beaches of former East Germany. 30 years ago these beaches were patrolled by the military to stop East Germans defecting to the west. Cans of paint were popped and squeezed upon the sand soaked canvas to create the acid rain.

The works seeks new places to hang. Inspired by Foucault’s concept of heterotopia, it finds solace in spaces of otherness. Informed by a youth growing up free, painting graffiti on the trains. Painting in the dark. Surrounded by fences, along the train tracks, in and on derelict buildings. Buildings which housed these parties. Places of abandon and neglect. Again, the work finds itself back in its familiar territory.

Acid Reign is emblematic of the freedom of movement in open spaces without borders. A freedom which is slowly being choked out of the people once again.”  Christopher Stead

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Christopher Stead (b. 1974, UK) lives and works in London.

Tangled, torn, popped, squeezed and then hung in spaces of other, the work exists to evade the paradigms of commercial obedience, white cube boredom, and the polarities regimented by cultural hegemony.

Informed by Thatchers dystopian Britain and her Acid House love child, the work explores free movement in spaces without borders. 

In 2016 Stead graduated with a First Class BA Hons in Fine Art at the City and Guilds of London Art School, London, where he received the Painter – Stainers Scholarship Prize and Brian Till Art History Thesis Award. 

https://www.christopherstead.co.uk/


 

Christopher Stead

“Acid Reign”

Solo Show at Urban Spree Galerie

Vernissage: Thursday, May 23rd, from 19:00

Exhibition: 24.05.2019-09.06.2019

Opening Hours: Tu-Su 12:00-19:00

 

Urban Spree Galerie

Revaler Str. 99

10245 Berlin

Infos & Catalogue: pascal@urbanspree.com

 

 



Urban Spree and Hura Collective present: ERBEN: VLASY

… The king remained as if the sword had stab his chest through. He didn’t sleep until morning; he wondered what and how, to so that it did not happen what he heard here …

Prague-based puppet theater and performance crew Hura Collective presents in Berlin at Urban Spree a puppet performance from the cycle of dark adaptations of the fairy tales of K.J. Erben.

K. J. Erben (1811-1870) was a Czech folklorist and writer of fantasy prose from the 19th century in the wake of the Gebrüder Grimm.

VLASY means “hair” – referenced in the performance as the three golden hair, and accounts for the first part of the story HAIR – EYES – DEATH based on the stories from K. J. Erben.

The King, who loved to chase game the woods, eventually, after a number of evil deeds, he longed to chase for the game forever. Hand of destiny, drowned Princess, revived skeleton, shadows, live sounds on the springs and bells in the tradition of family puppet theaters.

Prague-based Hura Collective, mostly through the “Echt Street Puppets” project and the leadership of Hza Bažant, is the main driving force behind the renewal of the czech millenary tradition in puppet mastery, bringing the art to a larger scale with some puppets ranging in the 4 to 5 meters range.

The theater performance is wordless, so it is suitable for all public. However due to a dark theme and supernatural elements, we advise it may not suitable for children under 8.

The premiere of the event will be launched in Prague on 01.12.2018 (http://www.jatka78.cz/cs/inscenace/erben-vlasy) and will premiere in Germany on Saturday, December 15th, 2018.

 

Hura Collective presents:

ERBEN: VLASY

Urban Spree Galerie

Revaler Str. 99

10245 Berlin

Friday 14.12. 2018 at 18:00 (estimated duration: 55 minutes)

Mit freundlicher Unterstützung des Regierenden Bürgermeisters von Berlin – Senatskanzlei – und Magistrát Hlavního Města Praha.